Digital Pedagogy: Twitter, Close Reading, and Learning/Teaching in Public

This is a quick overview of a variety of different digital pedagogy exercises and assignments I have developed for my traditional literature seminars and feminist, gender and sexuality classes at Stanford this past year.  Please take a look–feedback welcome!

Using Twitter for Crowdsourcing and Role-Play Exercises:

A Public Literary Twitter Role-Play: Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray (October 2012)

Literary Twitter Role-Play, Redux: Dorian Gray and Friends–A Decadent Soiree (March 2014)

My Queer Valentine: A Valentine’s Day assignment on queer literature, film, the arts, and popular culture

Close Reading and Communicative-Associative Reading:

An Image and Sound Interpretation of Wilde’s poem “The Harlot’s House”

A Collective Translation and Commentary for Charles Baudelaire’s “Hymn to Beauty”

Surrealist Visual Art and Literature, Collaborative Interpretation Exercise and “Exquisite Corpse Poem”

Thinking about Queer Genders and Sexualities, Then and Now: Bringing Past and Present Together

Learning and Teaching in Public:

Students’ Final Teaching Projects for a Queer Literature and Film Class: Turning Students into Teachers (developing their own Gender and Sexuality Studies mini-course and teaching materials for community groups, high schools, other college classes)

1 Comment

Filed under MOOC musings

One response to “Digital Pedagogy: Twitter, Close Reading, and Learning/Teaching in Public

  1. Gabriele Dillmann

    Petra, the Oscar Wilde exercise with Twitter is pedagogically excellent. It is a fun way to reflect and learn and interact with others. I also like that it encourages students to interact with the technology creatively expanding the application of twitter for teaching and learning/education. I will use your idea for my German literature course with the added bonus of practicing language skills. Thank you!

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